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Name Comments
126) ikatahico 
IP logged Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/51.0.2704.103 Safari/537.36
Tuesday, July 3, 2018 05:22 PM Write a comment

cibdol 4%
125) afatyh 
IP logged Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/51.0.2704.103 Safari/537.36
Tuesday, July 3, 2018 03:28 PM Write a comment

biokonopia
124) Peter 
IP logged Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; CPU iPhone OS 11_3 like Mac OS X) AppleWebKit/605.1.15 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/11.0 Mobile/15E148 Safari/604.1
Wednesday, May 2, 2018 06:43 PM Write a comment

I Absolutely love eshopps Products especially the protein skimmers. When I needed a replacement part, Sandy provided Unbelievable customer service. In no time she was able to get my part shipped to me. 10 out of 5 stars!!! Sandy is an amazing eshopps team member.
123) James Noble 
IP logged Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; CPU iPhone OS 11_0_3 like Mac OS X) AppleWebKit/604.1.38 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/11.0 Mobile/15A432 Safari/604.1
Friday, April 13, 2018 12:34 PM Write a comment

I wanted to take the time out and tell you the recent experiences I’ve had with your company. This last month I had a few minor product problems and decided to reach out to your customer service. A person named Sandy went above and beyond my expectations. There is many aquarium forums out there and Sandy is praised highly (and trust me if we don’t like a company it is shared with everyone). Having said that Sandy is a great asset to your company. By the way when are you going to make lights?
122) Carol Bucci 
IP logged Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; Win64; x64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/65.0.3325.181 Safari/537.36
Monday, April 2, 2018 05:31 PM Write a comment

"A Fish By Any Other Name" A few years back, my soon to be husband Joe, moved to sunny Florida sans U-Haul from NYC, with a 100 gallon empty tank. His friends at the Manhatten Aquarium Society had made him an offer he couldn't refuse! Fast forward ahead 4 years, our new Eshoppssump is starting this new tank of fancytail goldfish. I recently saw this one and promply named him "Mustachio". Upon checking out of the store with him, the clerk said"Oh I see you bought Mustachio!" Seems he named him that weeks earlier also! Ya can't make this happy fishname up! big grin
121) exuguw 
IP logged Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/51.0.2704.103 Safari/537.36
Wednesday, January 31, 2018 11:53 AM Write a comment

Have you been Zakłady bukmacherskie internetowe legalne picking up a new cell phone?
120) ekyrupo 
IP logged Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/51.0.2704.103 Safari/537.36
Wednesday, January 31, 2018 11:51 AM Write a comment

skuteczne preparaty na cellulit
119) Philip M. Fortman 
IP logged Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_13_2) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/63.0.3239.84 Safari/537.36
Wednesday, January 3, 2018 02:47 AM Write a comment

I bought the PSK-200 to fit in a small sump area that also includes a Phosban reactor. I soon discovered that the side mounted pump would start making a noise, that I determined was due to overheating. To overcome the problem, I have to keep the water level in the sump at maximum height for the pump to run cool. Since the water level can fluctuate, I also positioned the Phosban reactor discharge hose to flow over the top of the pump housing to aid cooling between RO refills. I believe the pump in-flow port should have been positioned lower on the acrylic cylinder to keep the pump down underwater to cool.
118) Rad Murphy 
IP logged Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; Win64; x64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/51.0.2704.79 Safari/537.36 Edge/14.14393
Friday, December 15, 2017 02:53 PM Write a comment

That little building in the foreground is my Marine Science classroom. Sitting on the banks of a normally docile St. Johns River. My story begins on September 11th of this year, as Hurricane Irma brought historic flooding to Jacksonville. The storm surge and relentless rains lead to our river rising six feet above normal high tide, and resulted in waves breaking through my rear windows and flooding the classroom. The only thing in my room that I worried about was my 250 gallon reef tank, which I knew was without power. The flood waters would not recede for four full days, leaving me without access to my room or my aquarium.

Expecting the worst when I was finally able to enter the room, I found out how fortunate we were. While I had lost all of my corals, only one fish had perished. I was able to save all of the others, and get them to a local fish store to be rehomed. I purchased a small tank to keep the pair of clownfish that my students so adore, but everything else was given up.

My classroom was finally reopened at the beginning of this month, and I have begun the rebuild process. Waves hitting my old tank and stand for days on end had weakened the structural integrity of the silicone seams, so we were forced to start anew. My students and I now have a 180 gallon tank in the process of cycling, and have purchased a S-300 Snow Cone Skimmer to help with our filtration needs. Everyone knows that this hobby takes patience, and now my students are learning this too. Having witnessed a total tank crash as well, I hope they are learning to overcome adversity.

I look forward to providing updates as our new reef takes off, and we work together to educate the next generation of reefers!
117) Rad Murphy 
IP logged Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 10.0; Win64; x64) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/51.0.2704.79 Safari/537.36 Edge/14.14393
Friday, December 15, 2017 02:29 PM Write a comment

That little building in the foreground is my Marine Science classroom. Sitting on the banks of a normally docile St. Johns River. My story begins on September 11th of this year, as Hurricane Irma brought historic flooding to Jacksonville. The storm surge and relentless rains lead to our river rising six feet above normal high tide, and resulted in waves breaking through my rear windows and flooding the classroom. The only thing in my room that I worried about was my 250 gallon reef tank, which I knew was without power. The flood waters would not recede for four full days, leaving me without access to my room or my aquarium.

Expecting the worst when I was finally able to enter the room, I found out how fortunate we were. While I had lost all of my corals, only one fish had perished. I was able to save all of the others, and get them to a local fish store to be rehomed. I purchased a small tank to keep the pair of clownfish that my students so adore, but everything else was given up.

My classroom was finally reopened at the beginning of this month, and I have begun the rebuild process. Waves hitting my old tank and stand for days on end had weakened the structural integrity of the silicone seams, so we were forced to start anew. My students and I now have a 180 gallon tank in the process of cycling, and have purchased a S-300 Snow Cone Skimmer to help with our filtration needs. Everyone knows that this hobby takes patience, and now my students are learning this too. Having witnessed a total tank crash as well, I hope they are learning to overcome adversity.

I look forward to providing updates as our new reef takes off, and we work together to educate the next generation of reefers!
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